JUNDO daybed by Mads Emil Garde. Jundo is Japanese for purity.

JUNDO daybed is made of bent beech veneer. The cushions come in a choice of three covers – textile from Kvadrat or black or cognac leather from Sørensen. JUNDO is available in a white oiled or black base with a choice of 1-3 cushions.

“By compressing the use of several components, the traditional bed-rib is shaped to serve as both bed-base and legs. The multiplied bed-rib is assembled to a bed with a sculptural yet functional form.” – Mads Emil Garde

JUNDO daybed
by Mads Emil Garde

WOOD WORKS
by Masayuki Koitabashi

Masayuki Koitabashi has made three pictures for MOTARASU. They are prints made from wooden blocks on Japanese paper made of bamboo: wood on wood. This is where the name WOOD WORKS comes from, a name that is also derived from the word artworks.

“Like beautiful music and like beautiful landscapes, I would like to make an artwork that snuggles up to life.” – Masayuki Koitabashi.

A simple and gently curved steel tube frame carries the wood seat and backrest. Hard and soft, cold and warm meets in both design and material to create the balance. FLOAT comes with a black painted oak back, and a seat rest with a steel frame in a special black powder coating, giving the chair a structural feel.

FLOAT is the first furniture design realised in a design collaboration between the two designers, Lars Vejen and Taijiro Ishiko.

“The FLOAT chair is designed with the intention to create a simple, beautiful and comfortable chair for the dining table, restaurants or café interior. The design is related to the two designers’ individual cultural backgrounds and as such brings together aesthetics from both Danish and Japanese cultures with appeal to an international audience. FLOAT is a chair with a clear and visible constructive simplicity while at the same time challenging the classic.” – Lars Vejen

Read more about Lars Vejen and Taijiro Ishiko

FLOAT
by Lars Vejen & Taijiro Ishiko

RIBBON
by Akiko Ken Made

Ribbon is a hook or coat hanger, made by bending wood with a special technique; compressed wood.
Material: beech / walnut / black.

“We find that when you use a hoot that is pointy, it will leave a mark on your clothes, and we wanted to address this problem. The solution was the Ribbon which will carry your clothes in a gentle way on a bigger surface, leaving no marks on your clothes.” – Akiko Kuwahata and Ken Winther

SEN means lines in Japanese. SEN is an artwork that comprises of hollow square boxes stacked in various ways. Mikael Jackson has worked with MOTARASU in bringing out the expression of his ceramic art on a steel base with a high-gloss powder coating resembling the ceramic base with the black glaze. The result is the exclusive SEN collection.

Each of the SEN art pieces has been carefully hand-welted, and as a result no two pieces are completely alike, and variations will occur. Be intrigued by the shadows, the SEN artwork casts with the endless expressions when the light shines on it. Let the SEN stand or choose to hang it on a wall and play with the way you turn it.

“SEN is an examination in the ability to contrast fragility with strength, the visually tight opposed to lose expression, and the orderly with chaos. It is a balancing act, and the black metal becomes lines in the air, strong yet seemingly fragile.” – Mikael Jackson

SEN
by Mikael Jackson

UNION
by Masuko Unayama

The UNION tray comes in an ash wood veneer base with sides of damped ash and handles of rattan. It comes in a small and large size.

“I wanted to make use of the bending technique which Japan learned from Denmark in the past. The two sides in the tray meets in the handles which symbolises a bridge between Denmark and Japan – a union. Both Japan and Denmark share the same sense of beauty embraced through our historical background, and I believe the design is an accumulation of our traditional life style. Both nations have inspired each other in terms of aesthetic spirit in the past and present, and we will continue to share the same value of quality of life.” – Masuko Unayama

The WA salad cutlery are made of steel with damped ash wood and rattan finish. Wa is Japanese for harmony.

“The steel and the bent wood meet in the cutlery and is bound together by rattan forming a harmony. The steel is manufactured in Japan and the ash wood for me is Nordic, so the manufacturing process actually also resembles a union.” – Masuko Unayama

WA
by Masuko Unayama

SHIRO
by Stilleben

SHIRO is a simple collection of three bowls that fit into each other. Shiro is the Japanese word for white. The shape is quiet and vibrant with no disturbing details, just soft bone china. The little blue dot is inspired by small Japanese stamps often used to sign a product or a paper. The dot also indicates the three different sizes of each set.

SHIRO comes in three shapes with two sizes of each shape and are handcrafted in thin, transparent porcelain (bone china). Given the very soft and vibrant material and the high temperature firing each bowl will obtain an individual curve making every piece unique. The collection has been crafted in Vietnam at a Danish DANIDA supported ceramic factory. The factory is situated in a region that has more than 1000 years of tradition with ceramic production.

“We wanted to make a simple, sculptural set of bowls that vary in size and could cover almost any need you may have for a container. Also, we felt a need of getting back to the quiet and clean feeling of the porcelain in order to focus on the shapes, and thereby emphasise the food you serve in them.” – Ditte Reckweg and Jelena Schou Nordentoft

YOKO is a distinct tableware collection. Yoko is a Japanese girl’s name. The simple, sculptural shapes challenge the material of the porcelain: it should be sharp, yet the material is soft. The teapot is the centerpiece of the collection, and the mug and little pitcher add a ceremonial feeling to the set.

The high-fired porcelain glazes come in clear red, dark navy blue, eggshell white and light celadon blue. YOKO launches first with the large porcelain teapot with a high gloss red or navy dark blue glaze.

“We wanted to create a sculptural and distinctive tableware collection, that could underline the purity of the white porcelain, and create moments of focus and calmness. The Yoko collection is inspired by our first trip to Japan in 2015.” – Ditte Reckweg and Jelena Schou Nordentoft

YOKO
by Stilleben

JUNDO daybed
by Mads Emil Garde

JUNDO daybed by Mads Emil Garde. Jundo is Japanese for purity.

JUNDO daybed is made of bent beech veneer. The cushions come in a choice of three covers – textile from Kvadrat or black or cognac leather from Sørensen. JUNDO is available in a white oiled or black base with a choice of 1-3 cushions.

“By compressing the use of several components, the traditional bed-rib is shaped to serve as both bed-base and legs. The multiplied bed-rib is assembled to a bed with a sculptural yet functional form.” – Mads Emil Garde

WOOD WORKS
by Masayuki Koitabashi

Masayuki Koitabashi has made three pictures for MOTARASU. They are prints made from wooden blocks on Japanese paper made of bamboo: wood on wood. This is where the name WOOD WORKS comes from, a name that is also derived from the word artworks.

“Like beautiful music and like beautiful landscapes, I would like to make an artwork that snuggles up to life.” – Masayuki Koitabashi.

FLOAT
by Lars Vejen & Taijiro Ishiko

A simple and gently curved steel tube frame carries the wood seat and backrest. Hard and soft, cold and warm meets in both design and material to create the balance. FLOAT comes with a black painted oak back, and a seat rest with a steel frame in a special black powder coating, giving the chair a structural feel.

FLOAT is the first furniture design realised in a design collaboration between the two designers, Lars Vejen and Taijiro Ishiko.

“The FLOAT chair is designed with the intention to create a simple, beautiful and comfortable chair for the dining table, restaurants or café interior. The design is related to the two designers’ individual cultural backgrounds and as such brings together aesthetics from both Danish and Japanese cultures with appeal to an international audience. FLOAT is a chair with a clear and visible constructive simplicity while at the same time challenging the classic.” – Lars Vejen

Read more about Lars Vejen and Taijiro Ishiko

RIBBON
by Akiko Ken Made

Ribbon is a hook or coat hanger, made by bending wood with a special technique; compressed wood.
Material: beech / walnut / black.

“We find that when you use a hoot that is pointy, it will leave a mark on your clothes, and we wanted to address this problem. The solution was the Ribbon which will carry your clothes in a gentle way on a bigger surface, leaving no marks on your clothes.” – Akiko Kuwahata and Ken Winther

SEN
by Mikael Jackson

SEN means lines in Japanese. SEN is an artwork that comprises of hollow square boxes stacked in various ways. Mikael Jackson has worked with MOTARASU in bringing out the expression of his ceramic art on a steel base with a high-gloss powder coating resembling the ceramic base with the black glaze. The result is the exclusive SEN collection.

Each of the SEN art pieces has been carefully hand-welted, and as a result no two pieces are completely alike, and variations will occur. Be intrigued by the shadows, the SEN artwork casts with the endless expressions when the light shines on it. Let the SEN stand or choose to hang it on a wall and play with the way you turn it.

“SEN is an examination in the ability to contrast fragility with strength, the visually tight opposed to lose expression, and the orderly with chaos. It is a balancing act, and the black metal becomes lines in the air, strong yet seemingly fragile.” – Mikael Jackson

UNION
by Masuko Unayama

The UNION tray comes in an ash wood veneer base with sides of damped ash and handles of rattan. It comes in a small and large size.

“I wanted to make use of the bending technique which Japan learned from Denmark in the past. The two sides in the tray meets in the handles which symbolises a bridge between Denmark and Japan – a union. Both Japan and Denmark share the same sense of beauty embraced through our historical background, and I believe the design is an accumulation of our traditional life style. Both nations have inspired each other in terms of aesthetic spirit in the past and present, and we will continue to share the same value of quality of life.” – Masuko Unayama

WA
by Masuko Unayama

The WA salad cutlery are made of steel with damped ash wood and rattan finish. Wa is Japanese for harmony.

“The steel and the bent wood meet in the cutlery and is bound together by rattan forming a harmony. The steel is manufactured in Japan and the ash wood for me is Nordic, so the manufacturing process actually also resembles a union.” – Masuko Unayama

SHIRO
by Stilleben

SHIRO is a simple collection of three bowls that fit into each other. Shiro is the Japanese word for white. The shape is quiet and vibrant with no disturbing details, just soft bone china. The little blue dot is inspired by small Japanese stamps often used to sign a product or a paper. The dot also indicates the three different sizes of each set.

SHIRO comes in three shapes with two sizes of each shape and are handcrafted in thin, transparent porcelain (bone china). Given the very soft and vibrant material and the high temperature firing each bowl will obtain an individual curve making every piece unique. The collection has been crafted in Vietnam at a Danish DANIDA supported ceramic factory. The factory is situated in a region that has more than 1000 years of tradition with ceramic production.

“We wanted to make a simple, sculptural set of bowls that vary in size and could cover almost any need you may have for a container. Also, we felt a need of getting back to the quiet and clean feeling of the porcelain in order to focus on the shapes, and thereby emphasise the food you serve in them.” – Ditte Reckweg and Jelena Schou Nordentoft

YOKO
by Stilleben

YOKO is a distinct tableware collection. Yoko is a Japanese girl’s name. The simple, sculptural shapes challenge the material of the porcelain: it should be sharp, yet the material is soft. The teapot is the centerpiece of the collection, and the mug and little pitcher add a ceremonial feeling to the set.

The high-fired porcelain glazes come in clear red, dark navy blue, eggshell white and light celadon blue. YOKO launches first with the large porcelain teapot with a high gloss red or navy dark blue glaze.

“We wanted to create a sculptural and distinctive tableware collection, that could underline the purity of the white porcelain, and create moments of focus and calmness. The Yoko collection is inspired by our first trip to Japan in 2015.” – Ditte Reckweg and Jelena Schou Nordentoft